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Wellness Symposium

Sarah Shahab, MD and Chef  Peter Reinhart

Sarah Shahab, MD and Chef
Peter Reinhart

Sarah Shahab, MD, was diagnosed with multiple myeloma, bone marrow cancer, when she was 43-years-old. She was given three to six months to live. That was 10 years ago. “America is the cutting edge of medicine and no one could do anything. Plant medicine came to my rescue.”

That is why Dr. Shahab attended the first annual culinary wellness workshop: Farm to Fork, From Therapeutic to Lifestyle Culinary Solutions. The three-day wellness seminar was held at JWU (Aug 9-11) and hosted by Standard Process, a company dedicated to whole food nutrient solutions, located at the North Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis. “As healthcare influencers we address how to improve the state of health across America,” said John Troup, Ph.D., vice president of clinical science, education and innovation. “Culinary is at the intersection of nutrition science and making it practical - and realistic - to apply at home.”

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Hands-on workshops with chef instructors Deet Gilbert, Susan Batten, Michael Calenda and Peter Reinhart included healthy cocktails and cocktail shrubs; different cuisines using flavor profiles adapted from the Mediterranean Food Pyramid; and ancient and whole grain breads.

Jerry Lanuzza, dean of culinary education, says, “Johnson & Wales University has a very strong culinary arts reputation around the world. However, we are also dedicated to Changing the Way the World Eats and have begun to partner with companies like Standard Process and other healthcare providers to educate people about the link between what one eats (or doesn’t eat) and their health. We don’t look at chefs to be ambassadors of out of the home entertainment anymore. More and more they are becoming a vital link in the health and well-being of everyone.” 

Megan Hamrock, clinical coordinator, says nutrition if the first line of care before a prescription. “Prevention comes down to diet and nutrition.”

Dr. Shahab, who lives in Richmond, Va., says she is eating to beat cancer. “Even if you have to have chemo and radiation, nourish yourself with the right kind of food. Your body will heal better when it’s nourished. You will fare better. I have more energy now than the last 30 years of my life.”